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Snakeskins by Tim Major – Blog Tour Book Review

Synopsis

Caitlin Hext’s first shedding ceremony is imminent, but she’s far from prepared to produce a Snakeskin clone. When her skin fails to turn to dust as expected, she must decide whether she wishes the newcomer alive or dead.

Worse still, it transpires that the Hext family may be of central importance to the survival of Charmers, a group of people with the inexplicable power to produce duplicates every seven years and, in the process, rejuvenate. In parallel with reporter Gerry Chafik and government aide Russell Handler, Caitlin must prevent the Great British Posperity Party from establishing a corrupt new world order.

About the Author

Tim Major has authored You Don’t Belong Here, Blighters and Carus & Mitch, The YA novel Machineries of Mercy, the short story collection And the House Lights Dom, and a non-fiction book about the silent crime film, Les Vampires. His shorts have appeared in Interzone, Not One of Us and numerous anthologies including Best of British SF 2017. He is co-editor of the British Fantasy Society’s journal, BFS Horizons.

What I Thought

This book has such an intriguing premise. A proportion of the population have been “given” special abilities as Charmers. Every seven years they shed like snakes and rejuvenate their original bodies meaning they live longer than ordinary humans. Usually the skin lasts only a short time before disintegrating into ash. But Caitlin’s skin stays, is clearly displaying human emotion and is taken away by the government…

The very government who have cut the U.K. off from Europe, call themselves The Great British Prosperity Party and appear to be Charmer led. Russell works for one of the ministers and gradually starts to uncover the truth.

Gerry is a journalist who is also working to tell the real story and Caitlin is just trying to come to terms with what being a Charmer means and why much of society is against them. Suspicion and lack of understanding, thinking all Charmers are the same!

A biting social commentary, a mysterious thriller and engaging characters to root for. Tim Major has created something pretty unique. I don’t think we’ll ever look at politics the same way after the last few years and this book contributes to that unease.

Thank you to Lydia at Titan for gifting me a copy of this book for the purposes of an honest review.

Snakeskins is out now.

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The Fandom Rising by Anna Day – Release Day Book Review #JoinTheFandom

The following post contains spoilers for the first book in the series – The Fandom.

Synopsis

It’s a year since Violet, Alice and Katie escaped from the dystopian world of The Gallows Dance – Nate’s been stuck in a coma ever since. Violet re-enters The Gallows Dance, determined to bring her brother home. After an argument that threatens to destroy their friendship, Alice stays behind. But when a rogue fanfic writer emerges online – posting dark new chapters set in the world her friends are trapped in – Alice is the only one with the power to save the story…

Author

Anna Day was shortlisted for the Times/Chicken House Children’s Fiction competition in 2015 with her novel The Gallows Dance. Combining Anna’s novel with The Big Idea runner-up Angela McCann’s idea resulted in The Fandom, a new novel inspired by the world from Anna’s original story. By day, Anna works as a clinical psychologist and lives in Newcastle with her family.

What I Thought

I was lucky enough to pick up an ARC of The Fandom at YALC and loved it so much I requested to be on the blog tour – you can find my original post here.

So I was very honoured to be contacted by Anna and sent a copy of the second book in the Fandom Duology for review.

Seriously if you’ve ever wished you could enter the world of books you love you will adore this series. It’s fun, romantic and full of friendship and sibling love too.

The Fandom Rising picks up around a year after the first book. Nate is still in a coma and Violet, Alice and Katie are ignoring the elephant in the room – the fact that they went into the world of The Gallows Dance. Everyone has put it down to a freak incident and the girls seem to believe they just dropped into comas too. Almost.

Violet and Alice have published a sequel called The Gallows Song, a Utopia in which Nate is alive and well. But then a fan fiction writer calling himself Fanboy starts using the power of the Fandom to make things dark and dangerous again. Nate is at risk in more than one way and it’s time to hop back and save the day.

I really liked how the female friendships are explored in terms of their complexity – conflict and jealousy as well as being there for each other. Girls aren’t just sunshine and sleepovers, or mean girls. Alice is left behind in the real world as a result and the introduction of the character Danny who helps her is welcomed because she can’t do this alone.

The characters we met in the first book are still in The Gallows Dance world and Violet might regret what they’ve written just a little. Even Utopias have conflict when new characters are introduced.

Like the first this was well paced, full of tension and an excellent mystery. Who is Fanboy and can Alice stop him? The answer may surprise you. Will everyone make it back in one piece?

With timely commentary on the nature of art and who stories belong to I loved diving back into this portal fantasy.

I marginally preferred the first book mainly because of the romance but this was a very satisfying follow up. Not going to lie I now want more and the super exciting news is that the series is in development for TV with Fox 21 Studios and the producer of the Golden Compass. My wishes are that they keep it set in the U.K. 🤞🏻and if they film the opening at LFCC this year I’ll be available to be an extra 😉 – just saying. And maybe they extend the story because there are things I need to see that are hinted at in the very end of book two. I’d be happy with extending this to a trilogy too 🤞🏻🤞🏻🤞🏻.

Thank you to Anna and Chicken House who gifted me this copy for the purposes of an honest review.

Zero Bomb by M.T. Hill – Book Review

Synopsis

Following the death of his daughter Martha, Remi flees the north of England for London. Here he tries to rebuild his life as a cycle courier, delivering subversive documents under the nose of an all-seeing state.

But when a driverless car attempts to run him over, Remi soon discovers that his old life will not let him move on so easily. Someone is leaving coded messages for Remi across the city, and they seem to suggest that Martha is not dead at all.

Unsure what to believe, and increasingly unable to trust his memory, Remi is slowly drawn into the web of a dangerous radical whose ‘70s sci-fi novel is now a manifesto for direct action against automation, technology, and England itself.

The deal? Remi can see Martha again – if he joins the cause.

Author

M.T. Hill was born in 1984 and grew up in Tameside, Greater Manchester. He is the author of two novels set in a collapsing future Britain: Dundee International Book Prize 2012 finalist The Folded Man, and 2016 Philip K. Dick award nominee Graft. He lives on the edge of the Peak District with his wife and son.

Zero Bomb was released on 19th March 2019 so is available now.

What I Thought

A clever speculative fiction/dystopia exploring the effects of automation on society. For me it felt almost like a cross between Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Terminator with shades of Station Eleven.

The book is told in 5 parts. Part 1 focuses on Remi and most closely follows the synopsis above, Part 2 is an abridged version of sci-fi novel The Cold Veil (Prologue, Ch 1, Ch 13 and Epilogue), Part 3 is one sided correspondence from a woman in the cause on how they target Remi, Part 4 focuses on Martha and Part 5 on THEMIS!!!

This actually worked fairly well although I would have liked to come back to Remi’s point of view towards the end. Part 4 allowed the reader more knowledge than Martha which ramped up the tension and curiosity. Part 5 perhaps leaves scope for follow up?

Most importantly I would really love to read a full version of The Cold Veil. This was the most Terminator like part of the story with a full robot takeover and part of it took place in Southampton and the New Forest – so not too far from me. Also I love when the power of stories is explored and the family relationships in this were so well described in such a short space of time.

In the main story Remi and Martha are both sympathetic characters in their own right and I did connect most with their aspects of the story although they actually have very little time together. The robotic fox Rupal was also a very dynamic character and perhaps not what she first seems.

There is a lot of social commentary in the early part of the book exploring automation, Brexit and referendums get a mention, increasing racial tensions and the mental health effects of the build up of bad news. I empathised so much with Remi’s need to switch off from the latter but also with the concern that the lack of engagement can also cause. It’s a real balancing act in today’s connected life.

How people are radicalised into committing terrorist acts even when they start off with positive intentions was also examined. The Zero Bomb of the title is the goal to switch off electricity and stop automation – how would we cope?

This book has left me with lots of questions and ponderings and I suspect I shall do a re-read in the future. I do wish that some aspects and relationships had been explored in a little more depth, especially how the sci-fi author moves from novelist to activist when the world isn’t quite as dire as in her imagined future (at least not yet).

I switched to this for the Care of Magical Creatures prompt for the #OWLsReadathon2019 because it had a land animal (Fox) on the front) and I really wasn’t enjoying my first pick. I made the right choice and read this in a day. It was really well paced and I could easily imagine the future London described.

I was gifted this copy by Lydia at Titan books for the purposes of this honest review.

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