Scan Number 2 – #IVF Update

I’ve been taking the Merional since Sunday and today (Wednesday) I had my second scan to see how things were going along.

First the good news. The juicy follicle on the right that was around 10mm at Friday’s scan was around 16.5mm (needs to aim for 21mm) and one of the tiny ones on the right is up to 10mm. Lining was thickening up but I blanked on by how much.

Now the not so good news. No sign of any more. Nothing on the left. Had bloods taken again

(oops I guess I didn’t press down hard enough)

The nurse was honest in saying she didn’t know what the consultant’s advice would be because, although you only need one egg to make a baby, the more eggs the more chances. Plus there’s no guarantee that each follicle contains an egg.

They got back to me to say that the recommendation was to reduce the Busceralin from 0.5 to 0.2 – I guess to see if we can wake the ovaries up a bit or at least to see if that 10mm joins in a bit more positively. I’m already of the full whack of the Merional. Back for another scan Friday afternoon to review.

It’s odd because since around 11.30 Thursday I’ve been feeling quick stabby pains down where my ovaries are and have been feeling a bit sicky and that’s continued today. I was hoping that that meant good things were happening. It’s odd how you can be convinced your body is doing stuff it might not be. I almost had myself convinced I was pregnant last summer but that was a no too.

So it’s not completely a no

Yes I had a blub

Yes I’m likely to have more blubs

But I’m trying to stay positive and remind myself that…

Will review again on Friday. There’s still potential steps that can be taken so trying to take things just one day at a time.

Thanks for reading

Now off work for the rest of this week and next and am wearing my pineapple on my wrist.

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Double Felix by Sally Harris – Blog Tour Book Review

Today’s Middle Grade book title is published by WackyBee Books and is a story that taps into the current push to gain a greater understanding of mental health, particularly in boys.

Synopsis

He skips every second step when he takes the stairs, taps door handles twice and positions objects in pairs. The problem has become so bad that Felix is on the verge of being expelled from school because the principal has had enough of trying to run the school around his very specific rules. Then Charlie Pye arrives and turns his world upside down. She’s grown up with very few rules. She eats cereal for lunch, calls a boat home, and has a very loose interpretation of school uniform. The question is, can Felix ever learn to be wrong when he is so obsessed with being right?

Author

Sally Harris grew up in rural Australia and after graduating from Cambridge with a degree in Children’s Literature, Sally has been busy writing and working as a primary teacher in both Australia and the UK. Her first book Diary of a Penguin-Napper, sold over 10,000 copies and her second book Ruby Marvellous, has inspired children all over the world to try their hand at cooking exploding finger buns! Sally loves animals, including penguins, but as she can’t have one of those as a pet, she has found that a dog is definitely the next best thing.

Illustrator

Maria Serrano was born in Murcia, Spain where she still lives and works. After completing her BA in Arts at Complutense University in Madrid, she went on to illustrate children’s books for several Spanish publishers, all of which are still available to buy at bookshops in Spain. In the UK she has worked with Oxford University Press, Pearson Education and Templar books amongst others. She is represented by the Plum Pudding agency.

What I Thought

We join Felix’s story when he is already reliant on rules and patterns and he is in the midst of those being challenged. It has got to a stage where it is affecting his daily life, his ability to deal with change and to engage with other children.

As well as being introduced to the new girl at school Charlie, Felix’s latest episode means that he is sent to see the school counsellor who starts to work with him on addressing his anxieties.

I loved how the story focused on the introduction of these new characters into Felix’s life and how they both help Felix, and those around him to see things differently. Felix’s difficulties are spoken about in every day language that children would understand and I love the analogy the counsellor comes up with of ‘Basil the Bully’. I think this would be a great book for any child experiencing anxiety to read to maybe start off a discussion with parents or school staff. Or indeed it would make a great classroom read to explore with children how we can support others who see the world differently.

Both Felix and Charlie are fun characters and I loved following their growing friendship. They felt very authentic to their age.

Author Sally very cleverly introduces common anxiety provoking incidents into Felix’s life – some that are everyday (playing with other children at break times) and others that are often out of anyone’s control (substitute teachers who don’t know you, medical problems affecting those we love). And these scenarios help him begin to see how to deal with the uncertainty that life throws at us.

The illustrations by Maria really bring the story and Felix’s thoughts to life and I particularly loved the Rool Boy comic which was an adorable way for Charlie to share her understanding with Felix.

The story comes across as very realistic with no quick fix, no perfect ending but a hopeful journey. Check out the structure of the contents page which also forms part of the story.

It is worth noting that the book is set in Australia and schools in the UK are set up differently. In fact children and adolescent mental health services are generally under too much demand and there is pressure for schools to focus on academic achievement. This means that when children with mental health or social learning challenges (such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Anxiety, Depression, ADHD etc) are achieving academically despite them having social and behavioural challenges they are not readily able to access additional support.

As an Occupational Therapist I see a huge potential role for OTs to be employed within schools addressing this more generally. Charlie even introduces Felix to an occupation that she thinks will help his anxiety. I sense a future fabulous OT in that character. One of my OT friends is exploring a PhD on this topic and I’ll definitely share this book with her, and also with friends who might have children experiencing similar challenges.

Today is the start of the blog tour. Do check out the other stops for reviews and author content.

Telling a donor conceived child how they came to be

I know I’m early in the process (Switching from Fostimon to Merional today) so this post is jumping the gun, but if I am lucky enough to have success with IVF I have every intention of telling any child how they came to be and this was one of the things I chose to discuss in my counselling sessions so I thought I’d share my early thoughts on this here.

I am hugely interested in the concept of identity and have studied the whole nature/nurture debates as part of my training as an Occupational Therapist.

I think there are some similarities between this and telling children they have been adopted however I suspect that the question of parentage is likely to come up if I remain single (especially after sex education lessons at school).

As I noted in my previous post I actually have a fair amount of information about the donor I have selected and I have every intention of sharing this with a child when it is appropriate.

I think the earlier you start and the more you can normalise something hopefully the more natural children will find it. How I will do this and at what age I think would depend on the specific child and how they relate to the world. General comments can be made at any time but I think being open and honest at the point questions are asked will be the most important thing.

Also I think it will be important to clarify the difference between the concept of a donor and a father/dad.

There are a few support websites that include stories from parents and also donor conceived children. One account from a donor conceived woman I read initially said she didn’t understand why donors had to be open because she had never felt the need to contact her donor, but then on reflection she acknowledged that everyone is different and having that option available might be necessary for some.

Donor Conception Network

Does anyone reading have any experience or advice with regards this topic?

Some picture book recommendations from a friend:

Little Treasure

The Little Pea that was Me

Why Don’t I Have a Daddy?

Back to the books tomorrow with the Blog tour for Double Felix by Sally Harris. Next IVF update will be after my scan on Wednesday.

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