Author Archives: kirstyes

The Future is… Books! My Independent Bookshop

There’s a fun new website on the interwebs where you can create your own themed bookshop.

My Independent Bookshop allows you to create a mini bookshop of up to twelve books and you can link to your local independent bookshop (via Hive) so that when someone buys a book online based on your recommendation your local bricks and mortar bookshop benefits. I’ve chosen to link up with Gullivers Bookshop, a local family run bookshop that are supporting the HPA group I run with our Accio Books campaign.

Here’s the link to my Bookshop called The Future is… Books! which is celebrating my love of Dystopias/Science Fiction Futures.

Click on the books on the shelf and they open to reveal a mini review or suggestion of why I liked them. I’ve not added full reviews yet but I will. I’ve chosen seven books at the moment but have a few more on my reading list which I’m hoping to add. I’m only adding five star reads at the moment.

Here are a few other bookshops (by some twitter faves) that I’d recommend you take a look at:

Books Galore! (by blogger and Project UKYA organiser Lucy Powrie)

YA Yeah Yeah (by blogger and Countdown to 5th June organiser Jim Dean)

UKYA Books (by author Keris Stainton whose writing course I’m currently participating in)

James Dawson Books (by author James Dawson who is going to scare me soon with Say Her Name)

 

Have you created your own website yet? Share the link with me below.

 

 

#Countdownto5thJune – Matt Whyman – Author Interview

Firstly huge thanks go to Jim Dean at YAYeahYeah for organising this Countdown to 5th June blog tour and for allowing me to be a part of it. You can find links to all of the previous posts and the posts to come on the Countdown Blog.

Next I’d like to thank Matt Whyman for taking the time to answer my questions about War Girls (UK Amazon Link). I’ve added a couple of comments in red – mainly as a private joke with Matt – I promise none of them are “Must Try Harder” though ;o)

Via Amazon

War Girls is a collection of short stories told from the perspective of women during the period surrounding WW1 and Matt is one of the contributing authors. His story Ghost Story was particularly powerful.

 

At the end of June this year it will have been 100 years since the start of WW1. Why do you think it was important to consider the experience of women in the war and why now in particular?

It’s very easy to think of Tommy in the trenches when it comes to WW1, but the fact is women played a vital role in so many different ways. This centenary has certainly embraced wider aspects of the conflict, in terms of coverage in the media, and the anthology seemed like a fitting means of exploration.

We’ve also reached a point where most people with first-hand experience of the war have now passed. Without a direct link to that generation, handing down their stories, it falls to writers to bring the past into the present – and there is some responsibility that comes with that. (There certainly is, and one which I think this set of writers handles very well).

How did the collection come about and how did you get involved?

I’d like to tell you that my incisive knowledge of WW1 made me an obvious candidate to contribute, but that would be, well… lies. (Lies, like the dog ate my homework – tut). I’ve watched a lot of action movies, but I don’t think that counts. In fact, having just published a memoir about life with a sausage dog (riiiiiggghhhht?!) when the author approaches went out, I still think there might have been a mix up somewhere. On the upside, I’m always drawn to a writing challenge. The research was intense and enlightening. It involved reading history books, papers and journals, uncovering news cuttings and talking to historians in a bid to get a clear picture of the event I planned to write about. In the end I found myself doing the same amount of groundwork as I would for a novel. (Well then you definitely deserve an A for effort as well as execution).

Your story in particular considers an experience I don’t think I’ve come across before. What did you learn from writing this piece?

The story is set during the Gallipoli campaign – a disastrous attempt by the Allies to open a new front against the Ottoman Empire. Getting my head around the history took some time, but what compelled me to write about it was an account by a shell-shocked British soldier of an attack from a sniper he claimed to be female. It’s a convincing case, but also called into question by historians who doubt Turkish women took arms.

It left me with a dilemma. The last thing I wanted to do was make claims for the existence of a markswoman who was essentially the product of mistaken identity or a traumatised imagination. At the same time, the defence of the soldier’s account has a great deal of merit. As we’ll never know, given where we are in history, I decided to write the story from the point of view of a grieving mother and widow who picks up a gun by circumstance only to question her purpose. So, she’s there, looking down the sights of a sniper as our soldier claimed. It’s just things aren’t as they might appear. Ultimately, I know what it’s about in my mind, but never like to tell a reader what I’m trying to convey. That’s the role of the story and the pleasure that comes from reading. In other words, I’m terrible at summarising. (No, I think you’re right, it is good to allow readers to form their own views too).

Which other story in the collection do you think brings a new insight?

This is a powerful anthology. Every contributor has sought to shine light on aspects of the war effort that are often side lined. What strikes me above all is that nobody falls into portraying their characters based on our moral outlook today. It’s uncomfortable sometimes, but the only way to truly get under the skin of individuals who served their country one hundred years ago.

You start your story with a short factual piece, do you think this freed you up to then enter into the narrative without the need for explanation during the story itself?

The story was finished before I wrote the introduction. I just wanted to be transparent about the contention surrounding the origin of the story. You could say I was keen to show my workings. As you’re a teacher, I’m hoping this answer will earn me a big tick in the margin.

In your story was it important that the woman remained nameless?

Yes. She has no name and no life ahead of her. Everything she loves has been taken away. She’s a lost soul, waiting to join her loved ones, and effectively dead from the moment we join the story.

At the end of the book are some adverts for other short story collections. How do you relate to short stories in comparison to novels, both as a reader and a writer?

As a writer, short stories are hard work. Every word feels like the compression of a sentence. What you leave out says more than what you keep in. You’re working with less but aiming to say more. I find it to be one of the more rewarding nightmares of the writing process. As a reader, I devoured short stories in my twenties by authors such as Angela Carter and Raymond Carver. I’ve written a lot over the years, but not by choice. I’ve always been approached, never learned to say no, and remain very glad of that whenever I see the finished anthology or collection.

And finally the question I always ask – Why do you write?

For the same reason that I was drawn to put pen to paper in the first place – because there’s nothing to hold back the imagination – no costs or crew to consider, or practical stuff to arrange. With some time and self-discipline, you can sit in a crappy bedsit creating a story that might cost millions to film, but won’t cost a penny. It inspired me as an impoverished 21 year old and I’m still mindful of that today.

 

Huge thanks to Matt for his excellent Grade A ‘Homework’. Matt has been working hard because he is also over at Winged Reviews talking about a solo project on Sunday 25th May.

Tomorrow’s stop on the tour is Nigel McDowell over at A Daydreamer’s Thoughts with Faye.

Faye is also the organiser of Kim Curran’s Glaze blog tour which I will be taking part in next Saturday, the 17th, with a character interview from Glaze.

Matt

Insecure Writer’s Support Group May 2014 #IWSG

Well Camp didn’t go that well, I only managed to edit through 4,000 words for a whole host of valid and probably not so valid reasons, so I’m feeling a bit glum.

Have signed up for two courses with Keris Stainton, one on editing and one on writing for teenagers. Hoping to get stuck into those this weekend.

Also purchased this book which is a work of art and, I’m hoping, container of helpful advice.

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I will have a full novel ready by the end of this year….please universe and brain?!

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